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A Facebook Answer. What I would do. What I did

There is nothing…noooothing that can replace what chewing does physiologically.

Let me address this then I can share a few other things with you.

I personally believe that it is the biggest single factor under our control that can change the course of our body health overall.

I am a survivor of cancer and even before I was diagnosed my body started me headed in a healing direction for which I am very grateful. One of the first things I started doing was chewing my food 100X. I literally started liquefying everything like a juicer and then swallowing the worn out flavorless pulp. I wouldn’t try that overnight but you might want to work up to that as quickly as you can comfortably. This practice alone will began a long term change that improved many things in my life. Not only did my oral health improve but my jaw corrected to a better alignment and my sinuses are much healthier too.

It literally fixes a whole load of problems.

I don’t count anymore because I eventually learned to just chew everything until there is no liquid left. How ever long that took. It has been so revolutionary to me that I dedicated a whole site to it…LoL https://chewdigest.com

NO mouth breathing. It was little rough at first but over time my sinuses improved greatly because of these two physical practices that focused on my mouth and nose. My inputs.

My body has a natural cycle; a rhythm. Very much like clockwork. I found that my body performs its best when I do the following religiously.

My body follows a very simple schedule that has nothing to do with me but the day/night cycles. It is immutable as far as I can tell.

  1. 12 Noon to 8 PM: Feed
  2. 8 PM to 4 AM: Assimilate what you ate from 12-8.
  3. 4AM to 12 Noon: Eliminate and cleanse.

    I eat no solid foods outside the feeding window. I’m ready to fall asleep before 9 and laying down with something good to read or write ready to fall asleep. My body takes off during this 8 hour shift. So I go to bed. I usually wake up around midnight and have a glass of water or two then back to bed. But sometimes I’m inspired to write and will for a couple hours. Then I sleep in till 6’ish.
    I almost always wake up religiously at 4 AM. Strangely when our body’s assimilation shift is over. It’s like it hands me back the keys…LoL
    When I first get up I juice 2 limes, 1 lemon and 1 orange and top off in a pint glass with distilled water. That and I ONLY drink distilled water.

I will have a big cup of green tea usually after 9am with some honey and lemon in it.

If I can’t make it till Noon I will have an orange. That usually gets me there.
I eat only fruit from Noon till 6 PM. I eat only one thing at a time but enough to fill me up. 2-3 times till dinner which is a huge leafy green salad with all the other good tomato, cucumber, carrot, etc. and then done by 8.

A few other factors I removed from my diet that made HUGE improvements in circulation and hydration levels were, coffee, dark chocolate and SALT. It’s all the same no matter the color, price or origin…LoL. It’s a rock no matter how wet we make it.

This is basically a high performance lifestyle/diet that optimally observes what my body needs to heal, recover and rebuild at the fastest rate.
I intuited most of this on my own by trial and error over a 3.5 year period. I’ve written about that too…LoL.

It was more than just a dietary change but a tuning if you will of my will with the will of my body.

And it just keeps getting better for me every day. I’m almost 50 and people think I’m in my mid twenties when they meet me. And that is after cancer too.
I can’t tell you what your body want’s, but I know what worked for me. And I don’t think I am anyone special. My body was wrecked and I was scared straight.

Where Do You Get Your Protein?

Protein is needed by the body for only two reasons:

  1. Tissue growth.
  2. Tissue repair and replacement.

Protein is not necessary for muscular energy, increased activity or as a source of fuel.

Back when I was eating meat heavy diet nobody ever bothered to ask me where I was getting my carbohydrates from. But as soon as I mention I don’t eat anything animal I am met with the inquiry, “But you still eat fish right?” Of course not, it’s an animal. They look at me worried, disturbed—“Where do you get your protein?” they ask, as if you might drop dead at any time.

Try to take a steak away from a Texan and they will cry, “But I need my protein!” as they reach for their sidearm.

If we are to separate emotion from reason, and propaganda from facts, we must educate ourselves about the true need of the body for protein. We must discover how much protein we actually need, how we can best get it and, after all, just what it is.

Perhaps never have so many been so confused over a subject about which they know so little. Much of the information the general public receives about protein comes from special interest groups such as the meat-packing and dairy industries. Consequently, the average person believes that eating large quantities of meat, eggs, milk, cheese, etc., is desirable. They may be full of carcinogens from grilling; they may cause cancer: they may cause heart disease—but alas, they all furnish that magical substance called protein.


Excess protein from any source is harmful; some more than others.

It is important that we have a realistic idea of the body’s true protein needs because of the damage that may occur when we eat beyond those needs. Almost every American consumes an excessive amount of protein, even by highly-inflated government standards. A protein-deficient diet is rare in this country, although nutrient-poor diets are the norm. Protein poisoning from an excessive amount of protein is more common than a true deficiency.

When protein is consumed in greater amounts than can be processed by the body, toxicity results from the excessive amount of nitrogen in the blood. This extra nitrogen accumulates as toxin in the muscles and causes chronic fatigue.

Acute protein poisoning, causes headaches and a general aching. Various symptoms of protein poisoning, such as a burning of the mouth, lips and throat, rashes, etc., are very similar to the symptoms attributed to allergies. In fact, many so-called allergies may be cases of protein poisoning instead.

A high-protein diet eventually destroys the entire glandular system. It overworks the liver and places a heavy strain on the adrenals and kidneys to eliminate the toxins it creates. In many people, symptoms of arthritis have disappeared after they adopted a low protein diet.

-T.C. Fry – Life Sciences Health System – Chapter 08 – Protein In The Diet.

Indigestion in a Typical Diet

In a typical diet, proteins are often combined with starches: meat and potatoes, grains and beans, milk and cereal, and so on. Starches and proteins require completely different digestive environments and enzymes, and when eaten together, neither is fully digested or used by the body. -T.C. Fry

www.terrain.wiki | www.chewdigest.com
www.michaeljloomis.com

Rational Fasting

From Rational Fasting by Arnold Ehret – PDF

To those who think it impossible to give up the usual mucus food (meat, etc.). To those “unfortunate ones” I give this advice: Chew your food, that is every bite, thoroughly as recommended by the American, Horace Fletcher, in one word “fletcherize.” Not that the fruit-eaters should not do this, certainly, but the poison-laden mucus eaters must do so especially, if they do not wish to sink into their graves all too soon.

Chewing slowly furthers the secretion of saliva which decreases the formation of mucus and prevents overeating. Of course, this class of people cannot quite achieve the standard of health and strength, preservation of youth and perseverance, physical and mental capacity of the faster and fruit-eater.

The Integumentary System

Integumentary System

The skin is the largest organ in the body: 12-15% of body weight, with a surface area of 1-2 meters. Skin is continuous with, but structurally distinct from mucous membranes that line the mouth, anus, urethra, and vagina.

Two distinct layers occur in the skin: the dermis and epidermis. The basic cell type of the epidermis is the keratinocyte, which contain keratin, a fibrous protein. Basal cells are the innermost layer of the epidermis. Melanocytes produce the pigment melanin, and are also in the inner layer of the epidermis. The dermis is a connective tissue layer under the epidermis, and contains nerve endings, sensory receptors, capillaries, and elastic fibers. The integumentary system has multiple roles in homeostasis, including protection, temperature regulation, sensory reception, biochemical synthesis, and absorption. All body systems work in an interconnected manner to maintain the internal conditions essential to the function of the body.


Follicles and Glands

Hair follicles are lined with cells that synthesize the proteins that form hair. A sebaceous gland (that secretes the oily coating of the hair shaft), capillary bed, nerve ending, and small muscle are associated with each hair follicle. If the sebaceous glands becomes plugged and infected, it becomes a skin blemish (or pimple). The sweat glands open to the surface through the skin pores. Eccrine glands are a type of sweat gland linked to the sympathetic nervous system; they occur all over the body. Apocrine glands are the other type of sweat gland, and are larger and occur in the armpits and groin areas; these produce a solution that bacteria act upon to produce “body odor”.


Hair and Nails

Hair, scales, feathers, claws, horns, and nails are animal structures derived from skin. The hair shaft extends above the skin surface, the hair root extends from the surface to the base or hair bulb. Genetics controls several features of hair: baldness, color, texture. Nails consist of highly keratinized, modified epidermal cells. The nail arises from the nail bed, which is thickened to form a lunula (or little moon). Cells forming the nail bed are linked together to form the nail.


Skin and Homeostasis

Skin functions in homeostasis include protection, regulation of body temperature, sensory reception, water balance, synthesis of vitamins and hormones, and absorption of materials. The skin’s primary functions are to serve as a barrier, and to prevent water and extracellular fluid loss. Acidic secretions from skin glands also retard the growth of fungi.

Melanocytes form a second barrier: protection from the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation. When a microbe penetrates the skin (or when the skin is breached by a cut) the inflammatory response occurs.

Heat and cold receptors are located in the skin. When the body temperature rises, the hypothalamus sends a nerve signal to the sweat-producing skin glands, causing them to release about 1-2 liters of water per hour, cooling the body. The hypothalamus also causes dilation of the blood vessels of the skin, allowing more blood to flow into those areas, causing heat to be convected away from the skin surface. When body temperature falls, the sweat glands constrict and sweat production decreases. If the body temperature continues to fall, the body will engage in thermogenesis, or heat generation, by raising the body’s metabolic rate and by shivering.

Water loss occurs in the skin by two routes. Evaporation & Sweating.

In hot weather up to 4 liters per hour can be lost by these mechanisms. Skin damaged by burns is less effective at preventing fluid loss, often resulting in a possibly life threatening problem if not treated.


Skin and Sensory Reception

Sensory receptors in the skin include those for pain, pressure (touch), and temperature. Deeper within the skin are Meissner’s corpuscles, which are especially common in the tips of the fingers and lips, and are very sensitive to touch. Pacinian corpuscles respond to pressure.

Temperature receptors: There are more cold ones than hot ones.


Skin and Synthesis

Skin cells synthesize melanin and carotenes, which give the skin its color. The skin also assists in the synthesis of vitamin D. Children lacking sufficient vitamin D develop bone abnormalities known as rickets.


Skin Is Selectively Permeable

The skin is selectively soluble to fat-soluble substances such as vitamins A, D, E, and K, as well as steroid hormones such as estrogen. These substances enter the bloodstream through the capillary networks in the skin. Patches have been used to deliver a number of therapeutic drugs in this manner. These include estrogen, scopolamine (motion sickness), nitroglycerin (heart problems), and nicotine (for those trying to quit smoking).

~Content Source

I wanna be a psoas major

I wanna be an airborne ranger, live the life of guts and danger.

psoas majorThe psoas major is the most important muscle in the body. It is both the main muscle of walking and the main muscle of trauma. In this post we’ll talk about walking. The psoas major, the piriformis and gluteus maximus are the only three muscles connecting the upper and lower body. In large part the balance of the psoas and piriformis muscles is holding the spine upright on top of the pelvis.

Every step you take should be the simple act of Continue reading I wanna be a psoas major

Who’s consciousness is this anyways?

Content Source – Researchgate

PDF: Understanding the emergence of microbial consciousness


The most fundamental physical mechanisms which are involved in the biological systems are dealt and studied in the new branch of science called Quantum biology. Findings resulting from these investigations shed light on the possible role of quantum mediated processes in crafting the primitive life forms and in the emergence of conscious life. Since biological evolution began much after the existence of energy and matter and its unanimity, the answer to the origin of life actually lies Continue reading Who’s consciousness is this anyways?

Cancer Without Disease

I heard this somewhere today. Cancer Without Disease. Which led me to look at this. Regulation of survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis of tumor cells through modulation of inflammatory pathways by nutraceuticals.


Almost 25 centuries ago, Hippocrates, the father of medicine, proclaimed “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” Exploring the association between diet and health continues today. For example, we now know that as many as 35% of all cancers can be prevented by dietary changes. Carcinogenesis is a multistep process involving the transformation, survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis of the tumor and may take up to 30 years. Continue reading Cancer Without Disease

Simply Younger

It would seem that I have figured out how to negate the effects of aging in my body.

Or at least the things that made me look and feel older. Aches, pains, freckles, moles, age spots, liver spots, skin tags, etc. Even arthritis it seems. I’m so limber it’s almost comical. I can squat down, bow, touch my head to the ground and stand back up without using my hands, aside from balance.

I don’t think my body will ever look like a seventeen year old again, but that’s what I’m shooting for. I’ve had so much success at this point that it is at least worth shooting for.

I am expecting that Continue reading Simply Younger