Where Do You Get Your Protein?

Protein is needed by the body for only two reasons:

  1. Tissue growth.
  2. Tissue repair and replacement.

Protein is not necessary for muscular energy, increased activity or as a source of fuel.

Back when I was eating meat heavy diet nobody ever bothered to ask me where I was getting my carbohydrates from. But as soon as I mention I don’t eat anything animal I am met with the inquiry, “But you still eat fish right?” Of course not, it’s an animal. They look at me worried, disturbed—“Where do you get your protein?” they ask, as if you might drop dead at any time.

Try to take a steak away from a Texan and they will cry, “But I need my protein!” as they reach for their sidearm.

If we are to separate emotion from reason, and propaganda from facts, we must educate ourselves about the true need of the body for protein. We must discover how much protein we actually need, how we can best get it, and, after all, just what it is.

Where does this magical substance of protein come from? Cows, fish, chicken, goats, and pigs? I thought so. Grilling up these tasty animals after a good marinating is definitely a tastational delight, but the result they tell us is cancer-causing. Even so, the average person, including myself for most of my life believed that eating all this good stuff daily was good for the body. Perhaps part of the confusion comes from the studies and promotions funded by the meat industry, National Dairy Promotion and Research Board, and The Egg Board by which we decide to add these things to our diet.


Excess protein from any source is harmful; some more than others.

It is important that we have a realistic idea of the body’s true protein needs because of the damage that may occur when we eat beyond those needs. Almost every American consumes an excessive amount of protein, even by highly-inflated government standards. A protein-deficient diet is rare in this country, although nutrient-poor diets are the norm. Protein poisoning from an excessive amount of protein is more common than a true deficiency.

When protein is consumed in greater amounts than can be processed by the body, toxicity results from the excessive amount of nitrogen in the blood. This extra nitrogen accumulates as toxin in the muscles and causes chronic fatigue.

Acute protein poisoning, causes headaches and a general aching. Various symptoms of protein poisoning, such as a burning of the lips, mouth, and throat; rashes, etc., are very similar to the symptoms attributed to allergies. In fact, many so-called allergies may simply be cases of protein poisoning.

A high-protein diet eventually destroys the entire glandular system. It overworks the liver and places a heavy strain on the adrenals and kidneys to eliminate the toxins it creates. In many people, symptoms of arthritis have disappeared after they adopted a low protein diet.

-T.C. Fry – Life Sciences Health System – Chapter 08 – Protein In The Diet.

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