Amyloid, Prion, and Altered States of Protein in Our Soft Tissues

How I will avoid Alzheimer’s and other related diseases. Let me know if you can see it.

What do these things have in common?

White foods, including pasta, cakes, white sugar, white rice, and white bread. Consuming these causes a spike in insulin production and sends toxins to the brain. Microwave popcorn contains diacetyl, a chemical that may increase amyloid plaques in the brain.

Diacetyl is an organic compound that is created naturally during certain cooking and fermentation processes. … Diacetyl naturally occurs in the production of butter (in fact, giving butter its flavor), cheese, milk, yogurt, whiskey, wine, beer, vinegar, roasted coffee, processed tomato products, and citrus juices.

Amyloidosis (am-uh-loi-DO-sis) is a disease that occurs when an abnormal protein, called amyloid, builds up in your organs and interferes with their normal function. Amyloid isn’t normally found in the body, but it can be formed from several different types of protein.

A prion is a type of protein that can trigger normal proteins in the brain to fold abnormally. Sounds like phagocytosis to me.

One of our lovely cells performing kamikaze. Suiciding itself for the greater good of the whole. For homeostasis it engulfs something it doesn’t like, something harmful to us; for our benefit, encasing it in state. Right there in place in our soft tissues including our brain; ready at a moment’s notice to give anything an all-encompassing homeostatic hug if you will.

Our soft tissues are filled with potent stem cells just lying in wait for something like this to happen. We call them immune cells but they would better be understood simply as consumers. They are there to denature something that is not supposed to be there, by nature.

Those cute little freckles on your face and arms…Those are evidence of a job well done. Next time you get a new beauty mark know that your body did a beautiful thing by protecting you. And the best way to avoid these blemishes on our skin is to not put the things into our bodies that would then require the services of these kamikaze consumers.

How Would We Choose?

As a parent, I don’t always agree with the dietary or lifestyle choices of my children. I have a 27-year-old daughter and a 17-year-old daughter. As far as I am concerned, they are both free to make their own dietary choices independent of my own personal will. One because she is a fully grown adult no longer dependent on my financial means for life, and the other because I choose to not interfere directly with her decision-making processes as she continues to develop into adulthood. With the younger of the two, I only asked that she, in exchange for her freedom of choice, allow me to share with her my own understanding about what I understand to be the best way of approaching both physical and dietary lifestyle practices. I figure she is best served by being educated along with being allowed her freedom of choice.

Sometimes I do cringe at some of the choices both of them make, but they are both good children and listen to me respectfully when I feel the need to disagree with their choices verbally.

From an external perspective, I don’t ever want to see my children suffer. I would want them to never encounter any form of disease. I want them each to live a life full of experiences completely free from anything that could hinder that experience.

So what if, I could grant them a life full of years. 127 years with a body that looked, felt, and by all measures was no more than 24. A body that stops aging once fully grown that was never able to experience disease. A life without hindrance where their bodies would remain free of disease or aging as we currently know it. Living to a ripe old age of 127 years and simply falling asleep one night never to wake up again. Would I choose that for them? Probably.

I imagine I would do the same thing for all of my family members if I could.

Now, what if that meant that they would have to exercise 30 minutes a day and eat a whole food plant-based diet? To me, that would be a no-brainer. I already do that myself and don’t find it to be a burden in any way.

If we could step outside of our box and look at ourselves objectively as just another human living amongst 8 Billion other humans, as an individual creation, how would we choose for ourselves? What decisions do we make because we are blinded by our own box that results in self-deception and self-sabotage? What if we could see ourselves as a part of a whole, whose purpose is greater than the sum of its individual parts and how would that affect our decision-making processes?

I suspect that if we could truly understand ourselves as a singular part of a greater whole that we would start making better decisions with the individual biological units we call our bodies. Because then, at least, we could see that our health and well-being are not just ours, but something more.

What if we could step outside of our own bodies and look at ourselves from a distance? If we weren’t able to communicate to that person that we are looking at that is us, what would we hope for in them?

I know for me that I would not want to see myself suffer ever again. I would want a life that was as full as possible. Filled with time. A life well spent. A life where wealth is not measured in denominations or monetary exchange, but one that is filled with our most precious asset, time. Time is truly the most valuable asset we have and we spend it each and every day. Sometimes wisely, other times not so much. The sad part is, once it is spent there is no way of getting it back. Time is the only true currency we have.

From that outside perspective, how would we love ourselves? If we knew that there was a way to maximize the human experience, topping off the totality of experience and time to a full 127 years(Option A) with a body that looked and felt no more than a robust and healthy 24, would we want that for our visible self?

What if the other option was a life that ended painfully at 78.5 years(Option B). A life that only had 65 useful years where the only real choice was a life of retirement, where our health would continue to decline until our body ultimately succumbed to a disease like cancer, Parkinson’s, or dementia? Which would we choose for that self we are observing from a distance? Would we be okay watching our life wither and our health fail or would we want to do something about it?

What about our grandchildren? What would they choose for us? Option A or option B? What would you have chosen for your grandparents? I know for me that I would love nothing more at 50 years of age than to know that I had another 27 years of time to spend with my grandparents that have long passed away. I’m not even sure that would be a tough decision to make. I would definitely go for option A.

These are the questions I ask myself as I seek a better way to convince my fellow man that we have so much potential that is going unfulfilled. It’s bad enough that we waste time, but what bothers me more is that people aren’t even aware that there is something we could, or should be able to do regarding that potential 50 years we are leaving on the table. And this is what drives me. What gives me that desire to continually move forward in figuring out how to undo the effects of aging that have plagued me into my fifth decade. I want to be that grandpa that is around to not only see his great-great-great-great-great-grandchildren but also be able to play with them at their own energy level without physical hindrances. I want to be that example so that they can see that it is possible to not have to fall headlong into disease if they choose.

What Grows in Your Garden?

If an acre of land gives birth to a palm tree, once fully grown could that acre of land do anything to remove that palm tree?

One might say, “I suppose it could starve the tree.” To which I would respond, “By what means or actions would the soil go about removing itself from all of the environmental inputs that are making it hospitable as a host for that palm tree? What would that topsoil have to do?”

Could that topsoil of its own accord proverbially close its mouth to the nutrient sources that originally by nature made it able to sprout, grow, and then nurture the growth of that palm tree to its viable state? Could that topsoil simply get up and walk away from its foundation of clay that it grew upon for so many generations before and until it was able to be that fertile ground?

The answer should be rather obvious. No. That topsoil or terrain in and of itself has no natural means by which to act upon that fully grown lifeform that is now integrated into its landscape. The terrain and its immediate environmental conditions are the biological accords that determine what forms of life are able to be hosted. And unless the terrain or topsoil as host is made to be inhospitable to that palm tree, it will perpetually remain a guest to the fullest extent of its natural predefined lifespan.

We also see this in garden environments with weeds. No matter how diligent a gardener is to remove weeds, they will continue to come back until the topsoil is made to be no longer welcoming to these specific weeds.

Now substitute the topsoil and the palm tree for our body and cancer…8)

[To Be Continued…]

Conversation With a 12 Year Old Me

I was doing some Uber driving the other day and someone asked me what I would tell a teenage me if I could go back. I kept it simple and told them that I would say 3 simple things that would be easy for any teenager to remember.

    1. Eat only when the sun can shine on it. 6 am to 6 pm.
    2. If you eat something one day, do not eat it the next.
    3. Eat 100% whole-food/plant-based. No animal.

Of course, if I could do that and had thoroughly convinced that younger version of me to do these three things, I wouldn’t be here writing this today. I wouldn’t have had to suffer through the last 4.5 years of recovery from bad decisions that led me to an advanced state of disease.

If I could go back and convince that younger me to live life the way I do now I would have never learned the things that I have given me the life experience and subsequent knowledge that has the potential to help a world full of people do the same as I have. Recover their health just as I have mine.

“I could have missed the pain, but I’d have had to miss the dance.” A line from the 1990 song, The Dance by Garth Brooks. Never have any more true words been spoken as I write this short essay. I could have missed out on this pain, but then I would have never had the opportunity to become the person I am today, nor would I have the future that lay before me as a result of that experience.

So in that sense, I am in some way grateful for all of those decisions that ultimately led me to be the person I am today. And that brings me joy knowing that I can now speak from a place of experience that can help many more people than just a younger version of me. And who knows what kind of impact that will have.

Maybe it will be one of my children, grandchildren, or great-grandchildren that I am able to help in the same way because of my experience. Maybe it will be a whole host of people from all around the world for many generations to come long after I have breathed my last breath. Maybe it will be you; whoever you are that is reading this.

I do believe that I am here for a purpose. I imagine that my existence alone is that purpose and that I am currently serving out that purpose even now as I am typing this short essay. Maybe that purpose is to scavenge the excess oxygen produced by organic plant life on Earth in contrast to the organic life on Earth that sequesters the carbon we exhale with every breath we take.

Of course, my self-esteem or sense of self-importance would like to think I am still just warming up for something greater that is yet to come. There’s just something about my personal identity that wants to believe I’m still yet to arrive at the plate to hit my grand slam out of the park. Until then I am just going to keep writing every day. I will keep banging away at this keyboard until I have mastered this form of communication. If it takes 10,000 hours then so be it. Maybe it will take less.

My goal at this point is to author a whole series of books on how to avoid diseases of any kind. A series of books that will be understandable by young and old alike. A series that will keep people from having to suffer the same fate that I did. Words that will move people to action. To a life of more sober-minded decisions that will ultimately change our future generations of life here on Earth without having to depend on pills or technology.

A simple life. A life of ease, rather than disease.

 

Do You Know Squat?

I’ve been practicing it daily now for 3.5 years. I drop down and hold for a 30 count first thing in the morning upon greeting the morning sun.

This after peddling my legs while laying on my back 50 times. 50 leg extensions while holding my legs with my hands behind my knees and then 100 leg curls while on my belly. It’s my way to start the day and get the engines running full steam ahead.

I also do 15 squats at a time, sometimes multiple times per day, while holding on to the kitchen sink. I may do that many times a day, but at least once so that I can do a tremendous amount of squats a year. How can that not do something positive for the body?

At this point in my morning routine, I do a full-body lymphatic where I massage all of my limbs and torso towards the jugular veins in my neck. The purpose of this is to keep all of the intracellular and lymphatic fluids moving in a positive direction, back into general vascular circulation for better overall health. I’ve seen the benefits in my own life. Here is what I’ve noticed.

Overall improved skin/tissue quality which in turn improves color and appearance.

It reduces fluid retention and swelling by moving excess water and metabolic waste from the tissues back into the lymphatic channels where our immune system can do its best work.

I’ve also noticed a better texture across my skin overall along with a reduction in scar tissues. My suspicion is that this makes our body more efficient at healing its injuries and illness related to direct trauma and surgeries.

And of course, possibly the greatest benefit of all, it is incredibly relaxing.

I have a very lofty goal of making it to 120 years of age with a body that looks and feels no more than a healthy, robust 34. But wouldn’t that be fascinating if I got to see my birthday in the year 2116? I would love nothing more than to celebrate my birthday at 144 with a body that looked and felt no more than 24.

I’m simply growing a fully refurbished body. And it is gonna last. This time I’m doing it the right way.

Death was once my master. Now it has become my greatest teacher. A wicked man that I once was, obeying the dictates bearing the fruits of ignorance in my daily life. I had no idea the path I was traveling and where it was going to lead me. But I have repented and now I will not relent. I have found joy in knowing that I am no longer a victim of circumstance or just bad luck because of genetics. That life is not a roll of some celestial dice. That it is not something that is in every way out of my control. But something more comforting, knowing that there is a will in this thing called life that wants us to not only be healthy and wise but also bear much good fruit unto life itself.

We are here for a reason. Life does not waste its force where there is no return on investment. We are here for a purpose and it is my pleasure to serve that greater good even if I don’t yet fully understand the goal. And that is why I am here to serve.

And it all begins with some squats at the beginning of each and every day with the first kiss of the merciful morning sun that brings me life and the motivation to rise to the occasion.

500 Words a Day

I would like to eventually be a researcher and author by trade. Sitting on my very own boat docked just across the bay from the Queen Mary in Shoreline Marina. 28 short miles away from our beautiful little island gem of Catalina, just off the California coastline. No more than a short trip across the water for a weekend stay. And this just doesn’t seem feasible as a wage slave. I no longer want my lifestyle to depend on my bartering with my time beating the same drum week after week.

I’m no longer interested in simply trading my time for money. Don’t get me wrong I will always need access to currency to live in the world we live in, but I’ve learned that no matter how much you make per hour, simply trading your time for money, a wage, is not the right mindset to have. I want to create assets that will continue to bring forth fruit long after my hands have completed the work.

It has become apparent to me that doing whatever it takes to increase the amount of money I can make per hour is just the wrong way to go about generating income. Futile to say the least. I heard Jim Carrey once say,

“I think everybody should get rich and famous and do everything they ever dreamed of so they can see that it’s not the answer.”

I think he’s right. Not that I’ve yet achieved riches and fame, but I have made minimal amounts of money per hour and I have earned rather significant amounts of money per hour and neither end of the spectrum made me feel any better about the work I had been doing. You either like what you do or you don’t. More money does mean that you can potentially buy more things, save more money or give more to your favorite charity, but it also means you are going to be paying more in taxes negating the whole point of making more for most people.

If you want to achieve wealth that is truly significant, what needs to be done is achieve what John Goodman in the 2014 movie, The Gambler suggests. What he called, “A Level of F.U.”

You get up two and a half million dollars, any a$$hole in the world knows what to do: you get a house with a 25 year roof, an indestructible Japanese economy sh!tbox, you put the rest into the system at three to five percent to pay your taxes and that’s your base, get me? That’s your fortress of f’ing solitude. That puts you, for the rest of your life, at a level of f**k you. Somebody wants you to do something, f**k you. Boss pisses you off, f**k you! Own your house. Have a couple bucks in the bank. Don’t drink. That’s all I have to say to anybody on any social level. https://youtu.be/qGC9FY65HBo

And this just makes sense. Of course, the problem for most still depends on their ability to get to that point and how that happens. Well, I can tell you, the answer is not to simply get to fifty, sixty, seventy, or one-hundred dollars an hour, because even then it will take a long time to get there. And whatever you are doing to get those increased amounts of wages are not stable as long as they are wages traded for hours of your time.

And for me, that answer likely is found within the world of content creation, whether it be audio(podcast), videos(YouTube), or publishing books as an author. It is in these areas that I have already achieved the level of master. More than 10,000 hours experience. And I would be silly to try and retool my life at this point because it would mean that I would have to start all over again at something new.

And so I am going to continue focusing my energies on writing. And that the title of this post comes from. 500 words a day is my goal, and if I end up writing more, it will just be icing on the cake. The answer has been staring me in the face for a long time. I’ve said it over and over and over again to many a person that I can pound out 500 words in a response to someone on Facebook, but getting to 30,000 words or more I am at a loss. Well silly me kept telling myself how I could do it.

500 words a day…

And guess what…In just 60 days, I will have written 30,000 words. Why did it take me this long to figure it out? Because I was focusing on the wrong part of the goal and not that which is achievable. That which I already know how to do well. 500 words a day.

Do I think I will be a New York Times best-selling author? I believe I will if I just keep at it. This is how success works. I know the answer. And knowing the answer is half the battle. The other half is putting into practice the first half.

So here I am, and here is my answer, and I will achieve success eventually. And I will eventually be able to achieve the level of success that means I can do whatever I want to do with my time. That and I will be giving a gift of myself to my children and their children and so forth so that they can get to know me better long after I am gone. And hopefully, I will continue to get wiser along the way so that my words can inspire them from far beyond the gift of life and fullness of time I have been granted. At 500 words a day.

-Michael J. Loomis

Fruit, Soups and Salads

This is a continuation of my previous writ “Why I Am No Longer a Raw Vegan.”

To further clarify my point. Because I would hate to see people walk away from a whole-food/plant-based diet when they don’t need to.

We can get enough of the right stuff in from a whole-food/plant-based diet, but we need to be sure to be getting ENOUGH of ALL in their organic forms. Calcium, magnesium, chloride, phosphate, potassium, and sodium are the 6 most important electrolytes that our bodies need to function properly.

These electrolytes are minerals in our body that have an electric charge. They are in our blood, urine, tissues, and other body fluids. Electrolytes are important because they help balance the amount of water in our bodies. Balance our body’s acid/base (pH) levels. Their job is to move nutrients into our cells and waste out those cells. They ensure that your brain, heart, skin, muscles, nerves work the way they are crafted to.

Our body cannot function properly if these are not being consumed in sufficient amounts. And if you get too many, our kidneys are there to remove any excesses. On the flip side, our body cannot make these on its own and has to work harder to correct the imbalances by lowering the levels of all the electrolytes across the board spending our vital energies and bodily fluids that could be used elsewhere.

The problem with a fruitarian, frugivore, or any other raw diet is that the so-called “approved,” selections oftentimes won’t provide enough of the required electrolytes for continuous optimal function resulting in disfunction. Not because there is something wrong with being a frugivore as some can do so successfully, but that most people on Earth live far enough outside of the temperate zones where there is plenty and often times find themselves eating more of one kind rather than a rich variety.

The kinds of foods that do contain ENOUGH of ALL the required electrolytes cannot be assimilated in their raw state. Hence, the suggestion to eat your vegetables in the form of a slow-cooked soup.

Pick any or all of our common fruits consumed on a typical raw vegan, frugivore, or fruitarian diet and go through the above listed 6 electrolytes and see how much each of those is found in sweet juicy fruits and gentle leafy greens. It should become obvious to anyone how problematic it would be and how difficult it would be to get enough from eating raw alone in most parts of the world we live in today. The only one you might get enough of is potassium.

Yet a homemade bowl of slow-cooked vegetable soup that contains dark leafy greens, legumes, lentils, and sweet potato for dinner a few nights a week would solve this problem sufficiently. The attached picture will give you an idea.
And to be clear, I am not suggesting the use of table salt. It is not necessary. But it sure does taste good.

Sodium is necessary for our muscles and nerves to function properly. It also helps by controlling the fluids in our body that impact blood pressure.

Chloride is important in that it balances out other electrolytes. It also balances acidity and alkalinity, maintaining healthy pH, and is essential for nutrient assimilation.

Potassium is important for overall muscle contraction which in turn also regulates our heart and blood pressure. It assists in the transmission of nerve impulses. It also contributes to bone health.

Magnesium is important to the production of what we call proteins; our body’s machinery that does most of the heavy lifting along with the instructions for those biological machines so that they can function properly in both stable and changing environments. The rhythm of our heart depends on it. It is a regulator of glucose levels in our blood and enhances our immune functions.

Calcium is important for strong bones and healthy teeth. It is an important regulator of nerve impulses and muscular movements. It also assists in the formation of blood clotting factors.

Phosphate enhances the work of calcium by strengthening bones and teeth. It also assists in the production of energy needed for soft tissue growth and repair.

Bicarbonate plays a key role in balancing our body’s pH levels while helping control electrical signaling at the cellular level in conjunction with sodium, potassium, and chloride.